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Lit Basics Week



It goes without saying that being noticed on dA as an artist isn't easy. Add in the fact that you're submitting literature to a predominantly visual arts site and you have an even lower chance of being noticed. Your friendly Literature Community Volunteers do their best to feature an array of poetry and prose, but even that is only a single day feature of ONE of your deviations. Getting a following or even just getting deviants to read your lit and give feedback is hard work. But you'll see a common denominator amongst those deviants that have made it.

It's community involvement. You shouldn't expect to receive if you're not willing to give. But how exactly can accomplish that? Is going to random Lit Groups and leaving critique on a dozen or so deviations a week enough? Probably not. Will participating in group challenges, prompts and contests get you noticed? Not by itself. What if you run a weekly or bi-weekly feature article of Literature on dA? Still, no.

There really isn't one sure way to get that much craved for attention. It's more a combination of things. So I took to polls, notes and chatting with the deviants of the Literature Community to put together a list of sorts.


  • Give feedback. It doesn't need to be a full blown ten page critique, but leaving a comment instead of just faving a deviation goes a long way. Lots of deviants will return the favor by browsing through your gallery.
  • Get involved with Groups. Pick a few groups that you personally enjoy watching; whether they be general submission groups, genre specific or just ones that have awesome prompts and contact them. Ask them if they have any open positions available. Or if you have a new idea for a feature or prompt series, run the idea by them.
  • On the subject of groups, don't lit dump your work. In other words, don't submit your deviations to 50 groups and hope for the best. Pick a few groups that are active in the community and submit your work to just those. Be involved with others submitting to that group. You'll get feedback and maybe make a few friends along the way.
  • Pimp yourself. That's right, I said it. Use the Thumbshare Forum, write something for every contest, join feedback groups, comment on Daily Deviations, ask for feedback in the Literature Forum using the current month's feedback thread (found as a sticky at the top of the forum) or self suggest your literature to the Lit CVs for Daily Deviations.
  • Post a regular journal. Deviants want to know that you're real and not some robot that pumps out chapter after chapter. Post a journal once a week and tell them a little about yourself. AND remember to respond to comments left on your journal.
  • Consistently submit new stories, poetry or chapters. There's nothing worse than finding a series of stories that you love and all of a sudden the writer drops off the face of the earth and doesn't post anything new for months. Sure, it's okay to take a hiatus, but write a journal letting your readers know that. On the same note, don't over saturate the system with four new chapters every day. That clutters up your watchers Message Centres.
  • Involve yourself with other writers. That's not just leaving feedback/critique for them, but also watching them and commenting on their journals. Make friends!
  • Cross post. There's a reason why dA includes easy share links on deviations. When you submit a new poem or chapter of your story, make sure to use the tumblr, twitter and FaceBook buttons to share your work.
  • Use commissions. That's right. Not everything is free. Use artists' commissions or start a thread in the Projects Forum asking deviants to draw your characters or a scene from your novel. They get the benefit of practicing their craft (and the :points:) and you get the added exposure when they post the artwork for their watchers to see.

I'd like to give much thanks to the following deviants for providing meaningful ideas, comments, insights and lots of pie bribery:

bryosgirl C-A-Harland MarcoEmma mormonbookworm TarienCole


Useful Links


Reading as a WriterHave you ever set down a book for good because you found something in it you don’t like? If you want to write, I suggest that bad habit end now.
Why, you ask? Because everything you read—and I mean everything–has positive value for you as a writer. Stephen King, and any author worth his or her salt, is a huge advocate of writers reading massive amounts.
Again you ask, why? How can everything be useful? There are a number of reasons and I’ll cover as many as I can.
Reading bad literature teaches you about yourself and shows you what to avoid—or at least how not to do something—in your own work. If you run across something that you don’t like, stop and ask yourself why you don’t like it. Is it just a personal preference? Was it out of place or poorly executed? Does it contradict something from earlier? As soon as you figure out the “why” of something’s badness, you learn a little about yourself and you
  dA Writers-Get NoticedIt's hard being a writer on dA. For every one writer, there are at least 15 artists, 10 of which are fan-artists. And why would people turn away from fanart, comics, and/or yaoi to read your poetry/prose? You have to give them a reason.
This tutorial will take you through a few steps which will hopefully bring your writing more attention, If you'd care to read:

1. REVISE!

I cannot stress how crucial this step is. Once you have your 1st draft done, revise for typos and grammatical errors. On the second time, read it out loud to revise for flow. Then check again for grammar and spelling. Read it again, revise word by word.
  
Can you create more impact with the same amount/less words? If you can, do it.
Now, here are a few things you should keep in mind as you revise.
          1a.Start BIG
          In most lit thumbs, the first 110 or s
Writing Useful Critiques
Preface

This article is written for LitResources. Our goal is to be a collection and creation station for all resources pertaining to literature on deviantART. This article will feature the wonderful world of critique! DeviantART staff recently made it possible for unsubscribed members to leave critiques using the premium feature, so we thought it was an opportune moment to educate the community about the many facets of critique.
If, after reading the article, you have more information or resources to add, please leave your thoughts in a comment! And don't forget to :+favlove: this article to help spread the word.

Critique: What It Is, What It Is Not

Though the distinction might seem obvious to some, people often confuse writing a critique with writing a review.
To make it plain, a critique offers thoughts and advice for improving a piece of literature or art. Cri
 

PE Feedback: How to Give a CritiqueHOW TO GIVE A CRITIQUE
It's a great thing that you want to critique other deviant's works and help them improve their skills through your constructive feedback. By critiquing fellow deviant's works, you are developing your critical thought and vision and thus, developing yourself as an artist. However, critiquing is not all about pointing out what others did wrong.  As ChewedKandi has pointed out in 'How To: Critiquing Artwork' "a critique is giving your opinion in a constructive manner about a subject - be it a piece a music, a piece of art, the meal you've just ate and so on."
That's the main point of this article: to share a few pointers on how to give a quality critique while providing links to a compilation of useful guides that focus on this very same topic.
Introduction: Let's start! :eager:
First things first! You've come across a piece of art that caught your attention and
   Why Comment in the First Place?Many people ask themselves (sometimes on a daily basis) why they should comment on a piece of work. Whether it's just a deviation that pops up into our message centres or a deviation on deviantART's home page, what makes us decide whether we should, or even want to, comment on that piece?
Why do we bother? Or more importantly, why don’t we bother?
This guide explores the thoughts that we may have, the excuses we make, and, hopefully, a few thoughts to encourage you to comment, not just with a few words and that's it, but to really give a fellow artist a constructive comment that they deserve... that we deserve.
What is mentioned below is by no means accurate or complete and it does not apply to everyone. It was written by ProjectComment as a Group, by deviants, for deviants and we sincerely hope you enjoy reading this.
A massive thank you to annajordanart, catadescour, katdesignstudio, Jenniej92 and xblackxbloodxcellx who all contributed in the maki
What is Worth Critiquing?This article outlines a few questions to ask yourself before you request critique on anything.
1. Have I self-critiqued my piece?
Have you given the piece a thorough examination, looking for ways you can improve, parts that could be removed/added to, techniques that might work better, etc?
If you haven't reviewed the piece for yourself, I highly suggest doing so before you request critique. Self-review is a skill you need to develop as an artist in order to improve. Critique from others is wonderful, but learning to apply your own critique to your pieces will help you produce better art on your first attempt.
2. Is the piece of good quality?
Do not request critiques on doodles, first writing drafts, snapshot photographs, etc. Critique should be reserved for a piece you want to learn from and improve, which means the piece should have required thought and time to complete.
There are always exceptions to these sorts of rules. A drawing that is half-way completed, for



Groups You Should Be Watching


:iconcrliterature: :iconscreamprompts: :iconthewrittenrevolution: :iconwritersink: :iconwriters-workshop:

and :iconbeta-readers: though they're currently on hiatus.




:iconcrliterature: :iconprojecteducate:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconrelic-angel:
Relic-Angel Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
A helpful journal. :3 I have been baring fruits of my labor for a while, meaning poetry and prose and fanfics, but it's kinda hard to get noticed unless I post in groups. I can't go on Chat now because my shockwave flash plugin is vulnerable... :( 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2015   Writer
The question becomes, are you submitting to the right groups?
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:iconrelic-angel:
Relic-Angel Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I suppose so.
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:iconprism0467:
Prism0467 Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2014
Sound advice.  Good work!
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2014   Writer
Thank you!
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:iconjchrispole:
Jchrispole Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2014
Now, for the most part I do agree with you. However, I disagree with using Journals; mostly because as a starting, or even intermediate writer, you aren't going to have alot of watchers which means Journals won't be read alot. Short stories are definitively important; as people can see that they only have to read one deviant and they are done with the story. After gaining enough watchers, then a novel is a good idea to put out.

Other than that, I do agree with your approach. 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2014   Writer
:highfive:

Journals is more for when you get a following, because it's an easy way to keep in touch with your watchers and interact with them.
Reply
:iconhina-star:
hina-star Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2014  Student
This is a very helpful advice but im a little shy to do the other things but still! I'll overcome it eventualy :D
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2014   Writer
Then I suggest doing a little at a time.  Don't try and do everything at once.  Start small and build from there.  There are lots of wonderful deviants in this community.
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:iconhina-star:
hina-star Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2014  Student
ok. thanks ^^
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:iconsingingflames:
SingingFlames Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Can I second the "Don't lit dump"? Excellent tips! :la:
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
I know!  Hate them.
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:iconliettore:
Liettore Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Well said! Very helpful advice. Thank you so much. 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
You're very welcome.
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:icontambit:
Tambit Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Professional Writer
Advice to take to heart.  I will certainly start spending more time in the community once I have more time to do so!  Which will actually be fairly soon...
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
:la:  That's what I like to hear
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:iconlovelymars908:
lovelymars908 Featured By Owner Edited Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Very good advice. :) I like to point out about literature, and I've come to realize that it's also visual art besides literary. I mean c'mon, one IS required to look at words just like a picture. Just saying.

I hate to say this, but I'm very slow when it comes to feedback. :( And I didn't do well on my first commissions since I found out lit is very poor product to sell b/c it's in very low demand. :( I'll try again next time.
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
I agree.  A lot of the advice that's in this article is broad spectrum and can be taken to almost any gallery here on dA BUT it was written or Lit Basics Week, so that's why it leans more to the Lit Community.

It is in low demand, but you also have to make sure that you put yourself out there.  If you're creating a quality product, I'm sure there will be people interested.
Reply
:iconlovelymars908:
lovelymars908 Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Sure, sure. It really applies to every art medium. I think a lot of people don't acknowledge that fact with lit being visual art, too.

Ugh, I know. I put too many rules and I think I might have underpriced my commishes a bit. Honestly, I don't think I might be doing them for a while, but I do want a prem. membership. I don't know about the quality part though. :(
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:iconthetaoofchaos:
thetaoofchaos Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
All good advice. I might add that developing any kind of a fan base usually requires posting work that some people like to read. I watch some artists that have little to no interaction with the community but who's work I admire.  

I understand that getting good feedback is part of the recipe for artistic growth, and so finding social ways to getting in good with other litters and increasing one's exposure will only help in getting more feedback. But the most important element to me, as a connesuier of lit, is to find something to fall in love with. Perhaps all this goes without saying, but I feel like putting your best, most provacative work out there should also be a strong consideration when compiling the to-do list to improve your standing in the community.
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
I've watched some people in the past that had no community involvement, and you know what, I've stopped watching them.  I want to know that if I leave a comment there will be a response given.  I'm not here to put myself on a pedestal where no one can touch or talk to me.  I'm here because I want to share my lit and I want to enjoy in others' art.  I love getting a response on a comment that I left from someone outside the Lit Community.  Though, I'll be honest, I haven't ventured far outside the Lit Community.   I like our padded walls.
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:iconthetaoofchaos:
thetaoofchaos Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
I understand your inclinations, and I mostly share them, though I escape the padded walls often enough. I enjoy the benefits of an involved community as much as anyone. I just make a few exceptions here and there for the brilliant introverts out there who post tremendous art but aren't very socially active, or who just don't interact with me. God knows I am not in the category of pedestal artist who doesn't need to interact in order to generate interest in my art. But in my time here, I've come to believe that what makes dA so great is the mixture of fantastic art and fantastic people; my favorite deviants being the ones who embody both, of course. 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014   Writer
:giggle:

Oh, don't get me wrong.  I watch people that don't necessarily interact with me.  I don't watch people that don't interact with anyone!  Like if there's 50 comments on a deviation and not a single one is from them.  That's what I'm talking about.  How hard is it to say, "thank you" even if you can't come up with someone more than that.
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:iconamour-raven:
amour-raven Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Student Writer
An excellent recipe for success! :diabolic: 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
I thought so.
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:iconilluminara:
illuminara Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Great advice! Also, don't try too hard. People can tell. Be nice to everyone, encouraging, and genuine. To get people to interact with you in a meaningful way in any part of life, they have to know, like, and trust you. Take the time to build relationships with people. It's not all about networking, getting feedback, getting noticed, being recognized, blah, blah, blah. Once you stop caring about all that and just focus on commiserating with people who share your values as an artist and writer, it gets a lot easier. Giving feedback is easier, receiving it is easier, writing for other people rather than just yourself is easier ... Writing is about sharing the human experience. You can't do that if you're always focused on yourself and your own work.

As a challenge, don't post anything about yourself or any of your own work for a while and focus only on other people. Ask questions, engage, think about the world from other peoples' perspective. What is it like for them to be an artist and writer? How is their journey different from yours? How is it the same? What can you learn from that and apply to your own journey?

As John Green would say, start imaging the world more complexly. Broaden your focus and see what happens. Art is valuable because it affects other people. When affecting other people in a positive way becomes more important than how they can affect you, everything suddenly makes sense. You begin to feel your true purpose as a writer and thus your true purpose for being in a community like dA in the first place. Yeah, it's a community, not just a gallery. We seem to forget that from time to time. I know I do.
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
I agree.  But I also tend to prefer to critique from people I don't know.  It's always more honest.  Though I have taken the time to make friends on here.  Just a few.  :giggle:

That's actually something I don't forget.  I actually write less since I'm on dA because I'm more involved with others than my own shit.  :dummy:
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:iconilluminara:
illuminara Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Yeah, but some people take a lot of liberties they really shouldn't for the sake of "honesty." It's not fun to be on the receiving end of that (even if the "honest" person means well). I'd rather be critiqued by people I know, because it cuts down on a lot of the BS and pretense, and the critique is more useful because the person already knows my style and what I'm trying to accomplish with writing and doesn't waste as much of both our times with advice/suggestions that just aren't helpful. I also feel my critiques are more valuable given to people who know trust me, but that's just my take on it. :shrug: 

Awesome, and that makes you one of the few as far as I can tell. Most people seem to use the community as their personal drama dumping ground. There are some awesome people who really do try to engage and educate and make the community better, but it would be nice if even more people joined that particular band wagon. Things like Project Educate definitely help! =D
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
Totally understandable.  I'm not saying critique by friends is a bad thing, just that critique by strangers shouldn't always be overlooked either.  I give "critique" to pretty much anyone.  I tend to stay away from the official critique thingy because I'm just giving my opinion. 

It's very seldom that I air dirty laundry in public.  Unless you're a close friend, I tend to just give the good updates on life and keep my personal shit out of it.  I avoid drama like the plague.  We certainly get an awesome set of individuals every time we run a PE week.  Though we usually see the same faces, there are usually a few new ones and I really like seeing that.
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:iconilluminara:
illuminara Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
:aww: 

Yeah, drama just stresses me out. Gotta avoid it at all costs, probably to a fault ... if that's possible. :P

You do have awesome folks running PE. Keep up the good work!
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:icontommyboywood:
tommyboywood Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Helpful grim. Thanks
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
:salute:
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:iconliliwrites:
LiliWrites Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
:clap: Great guide. Short, but comprehensive. 
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
I try to keep my PE week articles as short as possible.  Higher chance of people reading them that way.
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:iconliliwrites:
LiliWrites Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Yes. Very true.
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:iconkerriecat:
Kerriecat Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014
Looks like this is useful my friend.
Reply
:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
:highfive:
Reply
:iconkerriecat:
Kerriecat Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014
FAINT HIGH FIVE.  


why because we boss. XD
Reply
:iconoojitkaoo:
OoJitkaoO Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
This is a text full of really useful tipps and tricks! Well done, dude! 
Reply
:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
Thank you.
Reply
:iconmilathelovergirl19:
MilaTheLoverGirl19 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
that are some wise words you've said there
Reply
:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
:love:
Reply
:iconmilathelovergirl19:
MilaTheLoverGirl19 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This is very helpful.
Reply
:iconbryosgirl:
bryosgirl Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Wait.... There was pie?!  o_o  Why was I not told about this? :XD:
Reply
:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
There is always pie when I'm concerned.
Reply
:iconbryosgirl:
bryosgirl Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Ah, good point. Silly me, lol. ^^;
Reply
:iconayeaye12:
AyeAye12 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2014  Student Writer
Great article, gets me in the proactive mood :thumbsup:
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:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
:la:
Reply
:iconjgfceit:
jgfceit Featured By Owner Edited Jul 27, 2014  Student Writer
Really helpful. I can see you put a lot of time into it. :)
Reply
:iconinknalcohol:
inknalcohol Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014   Writer
Thank you and I did.  Glad you've found it useful.
Reply
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